Children's · Teen Fiction · YA

Lockwood & Co: The Screaming Staircase

book-jacket2

by: Jonathon Stroud

(gif from his US website)

Jonathon Stroud is one of my favorite children’s authors – the Bartimaeus trilogy is amazing and is the reason I am constantly irrationally excited for, and then immediately disappointed by, footnotes.  Stroud has a lot to answer for.

Stroud’s newest work is the first in a new series – yay! Told in first person point of view, it’s the tale of Lucy Carlyle, a young ghost hunter in an alternate London plagued by an epidemic of ghosts.  After a harrowing experience with her first boss in a small village, she runs off to London and joins Lockwood & Co, London’s smallest ghostbusting* agency.

Lockwood and Co is no ordinary agency.  It’s run entirely by children, with a lack of adult supervisors.  (In this London, adults can’t see ghosts, though they can be hurt by them.)  It has only three members, all of which are uniquely talented.  And they are eager for the cases that nobody else can solve.

First of all, don’t read this book right before bed if you’re a big ‘fraidy-cat like I am.  Stroud is a master of creating a dark, tense atmosphere and I ended up huddled under my covers, rationalizing away my sudden fear of the dark. (However, I am a gigantic ‘fraidy-cat.  I read Pet Sementary at 16 and for months afterwards I was scared to feed our lambs after dark.)

Secondly, it was a really excellent book. This books works both as a stand-alone and as a set-up for a longer series.  The ending wrapped up the big questions while leaving a few smaller details that can neatly lead into an overarching series plotline.  Plotwise, it was very well done.  Tight, suspenseful, well-paced enough that the reader never feels lost but is still on the edge of their seat – just amazing!

Lucy, the main character and narrator was intelligent, observant, and mature, though not eerily so. My favorite part of her was how she was beginning to really note when things were unfair; no fits, just silent, slightly puzzled observation.  Part of growing up is finding out in lots of little ways that the world isn’t fair.  Stroud does a good job of capturing this process.

Of note, Lucy comes with both traditionally feminine and masculine traits, which were treated as both strengths and weaknesses, depending on the situation.  It was nice to see a female character that was strong because of her feminine traits but who was also forced to be realistic about associated weaknesses.

George, the third partner comes off a little underdeveloped, but it works because that’s how Lucy sees him.  I think he’ll develop more as Lucy learns to appreciate him as a team member – we see a little of that, and you get glimpses of George through his actions, but I think in further books he’ll really shine.

Anthony, the leader, is bigger and louder than George, so we see a lot more of him throughout the book.  He’s much more developed, partially because Lucy is more interested in him as a person, and partially because the reader gets to interact with him more.  He’s charming, confident, and a big thinker, whereas George is quiet, flustered, and a details person.

Beyond that, this book does set up a conflict between children and adults, which is not my favorite.  (Now that I think about, that was a theme in the Bartimaeus trilogy as well.)   It does allow the children to exist as the true masters of their stories,  but all adults are portrayed with the same anti-child overtones, which gets boring.

Overall, I really enjoyed this action-adventure supernatural fantasy.  If you like ghosts, alternate yet similar Earths, or suspenseful tales, please give this one a try! (And Do Not let it being a children’s book deter you.  Adults will enjoy this book without feeling infantilized.)  If you shy away from all things scary, or if you truly dislike young teen protagonists, then this, sadly, may not be the book for you.

Did you like this better or worse than Stroud’s other works, especially the Bartimaeus trilogy? Please leave a comment letting me know what you think!

*You just can’t talk about ghosts without referencing “Ghostbusters” somewhere!

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3 thoughts on “Lockwood & Co: The Screaming Staircase

  1. I actually haven’t read any of Jonathon Stroud’s works – like you I dive under the covers at the first sight of a scary bit, so I don’t seek out ‘Halloween’ stories! 🙂 Lovely review, Lucy sounds like a character I might admire. Her alternate London certain sounds interesting. Great review, I’m glad you enjoyed this one!

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